Endodontic

Check out Mr Bur Endodontic bur collection. This page includes diamond burs and carbide burs for endo. Cover range from endo access bur, pulp chamfer, non-end cutting bur such as endoZ

Contra Angle Pear Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Pear Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Pointed Cone Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Pointed Cone Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Peach Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Peach Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Taper Flat End Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Taper Flat End Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Cylinder Flat End Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Cylinder Flat End Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Taper Round End Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Taper Round End Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Inverted Cone Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Inverted Cone Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Round Collar Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Round Collar Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Contra Angle Round Diamond Bur RA
Contra Angle Round Diamond Bur RA
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation
Endo Access Round Ball Coarse Long Neck Diamond Bur FG
Endo Access Round Ball Coarse Long Neck Diamond Bur FG
Cavity Preparation Root Canal Preparation

What is an Endodontist?

An endodontist is a dental specialist dedicated to addressing intricate tooth problems that primarily impact tooth pulp. The term "pulp" refers to the nerves, blood vessels, and other tissues deep within each tooth, beyond the outer enamel layer visible in the mirror.

Endodontists employ advanced techniques to address issues related to dental pulp and roots. The root, located below the gums, anchors the tooth in place. The primary goal of endodontists is to alleviate tooth or mouth pain while preserving your natural tooth whenever feasible.

What does an Endodontist do?

Endodontists excel in identifying and addressing intricate sources of tooth pain. Their expertise lies in alleviating pain while ensuring the preservation of your natural tooth. These specialists are adept at saving teeth, even in cases of severe damage or decay.

Common reasons to see an Endodontist

Endodontists specialize in addressing damaged tooth pulp or root tissues resulting from diverse causes, including:

  1. Tooth Decay: The deterioration of a tooth due to inadequate oral hygiene. If an untreated cavity affects your tooth's root tissues, leading to inflammation (pulpitis) or infection, an endodontist may be consulted.
  2. Tooth Injuries: Trauma to the tooth, such as from a significant fall or impact.
  3. Tooth Abscess: The formation of pus due to bacterial infiltration inside the tooth or gums.
  4. Cracked Tooth: Damage that creates an opening for bacteria, potentially leading to infection.

Endodontics procedures

Endodontists, often referred to as root canal dentists, excel in performing root canal treatments, distinguishing them from general dentists. The extensive training and substantial experience of endodontists make them experts in root canal procedures.

Key procedures performed by endodontists include:

  1. Root Canal: Efficient removal of damaged or infected tooth pulp, followed by the resealing of the tooth to prevent reinfection.
  2. Endodontic Retreatment: Replacement of materials from a prior root canal that did not heal correctly.
  3. Endodontic Surgery: Specialized surgical interventions, such as apicoectomy (removal of the end or tip of a tooth's root).
  4. Emergency Dental Surgery: Addressing complex dental injuries or treating severe tooth infections promptly.
  5. Tooth Extraction (Removal) Surgery: Extraction of a tooth in cases where extensive tissue damage prevents preservation.
  6. Dental Implant Surgery: Precise placement of dental implants to support prosthetics like bridges, restoring both the appearance and function of teeth after extraction.

It's essential to note that, as qualified dentists, endodontists also offer general dentistry services, including cleanings, whitening, veneers, crowns, and more. Rely on endodontists for comprehensive dental care, particularly when specialized expertise is needed.

What are Carbide Burs?

Carbide Burs are dental rotary tools crafted from Tungsten-carbide material, a compound (WC) with equal parts carbon and tungsten atoms. Initially, a fine gray powder, it transforms into various shapes through sintering, finding applications in dental instruments, industrial machinery, cutting tools, chisels, abrasives, armor-piercing shells, and jewelry.

What are Dental carbide burs?

The popularity of tungsten carbide burs in dentistry has surged in recent years due to their excellence in the preparation, adjustment, and cutting of various materials. These dental burs, composed of a super-hard and highly resistant chemical compound, are ideal for precise cutting and drilling. In contrast to diamond burs, carbide dental burs leave a smoother surface rather than a rough one. They come in various types and sizes, distinguished by shank, head, and grit. Among the most sought-after types are inverted cone burs, straight fissure burs, straight fissure cross-cut burs, fissure tapered burs, short fissure burs, zekrya surgical burs, Lindemann burs, metal-cutting dental burs, cross-cut tapered fissure burs, and safe-ended endo burs.

Why choose MR BUR Dental Carbide Burs?

Experience precision and superior finish with MR BUR Dental Carbide burs, crafted in Europe for stringent quality control. These burs offer zero vibration, ensuring optimal performance. Plus, they can endure repeated sterilization without the risk of rusting.

Differences between Carbide and Diamond burs

Diamond and carbide burs vary in precision, durability, and surface roughness. Diamond burs offer greater accuracy and less invasiveness, minimizing the impact on the tooth's inner pulp. Carbide burs are known for durability, longevity, and resistance to heat. Opt for carbide burs for achieving a smoother surface, while diamond burs excel in high-speed grinding tasks like cutting zirconia or ceramic crowns. Learn more about the distinctions between Zirconia and Carbide burs here.